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Patristic Texts

When Requests are Made to God and are Not Immediately Answered

Filed in Patristic Texts by on April 18, 2013 0 Comments • views: 888
When Requests are Made to God and are Not Immediately Answered

We must not become upset if for a while the Lord seems to allow our requests to go unheard. Naturally the Lord would be delighted if in one moment all men became dispassionate. But He knows, in His providence, that this would not be to their advantage.

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Saint John of the Ladder and the Frog

Filed in Patristic Texts by on April 18, 2013 0 Comments • views: 921
Saint John of the Ladder and the Frog

When we draw water from a well, it can happen that we inadvertently also bring up a frog. When we acquire virtues we can sometimes find ourselves involved with the vices which are imperceptibly interwoven with them.

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Insights on True Repentance

Filed in Patristic Texts by on April 17, 2013 0 Comments • views: 970
Insights on True Repentance

Repentance is the renewal of baptism. Repentance is a contract with God for a second life. A penitent is a buyer of humility. Repentance is constant distrust of bodily comfort… Repentance is the daughter of hope and the renunciation of despair… Repentance is reconciliation with the Lord by the practice of good deeds contrary to the sins. Repentance is purification of conscience. Repentance is the voluntary endurance of all afflictions.

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Saint Gregory Palamas: Homily 33-Virtues and Opposite Passions

Filed in Patristic Texts by on March 30, 2013 0 Comments • views: 2432
Saint Gregory Palamas: Homily 33-Virtues and Opposite Passions

WHATEVER you sow in cultivated ground, you reap the same. If you plant fruit trees, or sow wheat, barley or some other useful crop, the earth brings them forth and they grow and are fruitful. But if the land is left untilled and unsown, it sprouts useless plants, mostly the thorns and thistles mentioned in the curse pronounced against us (Gen. 3:18).

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“How can we lead the solitary life?”

Filed in Patristic Texts by on February 7, 2013 0 Comments • views: 864
“How can we lead the solitary life?”

“Some people living carelessly in the world have asked me: ‘We have wives and are beset with social cares, and how can we lead the solitary life?’ I replied to them: ‘Do all the good you can; do not speak evil of anyone; do not steal from anyone; do not lie to anyone; do not […]

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Saint Isidore of Pelusium on Passages from the Gospel of Matthew 24-26

Filed in Patristic Texts by on February 4, 2013 0 Comments • views: 813
Saint Isidore of Pelusium on Passages from the Gospel of Matthew 24-26

St. Isidore of Pelusium interprets certain words of Holy Scripture in this manner: “Two [women] will be grinding at the mill; one will be taken, and one will be left” (Matthew 24:4). This means that many are dedicating themselves to the spiritual life, but with different intentions; some sincerely and steadfastly and others negligently and […]

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Saint Isidore of Pelusium: On Evil Thoughts

Filed in Patristic Texts by on February 4, 2013 0 Comments • views: 792
Saint Isidore of Pelusium: On Evil Thoughts

Whence is it that evil thoughts come forth from the heart, and defile a man? Doubtless, because the laborers are asleep who should be keeping watch, so as to safeguard and preserve the fruits of good seed that is growing up. For unless we have weakened in our vigilance, by gluttony and by sloth, defiling […]

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14 Letters of Saint Isidore of Pelusium

Filed in Patristic Texts by on February 4, 2013 0 Comments • views: 1449
14 Letters of Saint Isidore of Pelusium

1. To the monk Nilus. The holy bishops and the guides of the monastic discipline, from the conflicts and struggles which they underwent,[1] established fitting terms, for activities for our instruction and knowledge. They called the withdrawal from the material world “renunciation,” and ready obedience “subjection.” And they, on the one hand, only had nature […]

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Excerpt from a Seventh Century Sermon by Saint Sophronius of Jerusalem on the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord

Filed in Patristic Texts by on February 2, 2013 0 Comments • views: 844
Excerpt from a Seventh Century Sermon by Saint Sophronius of Jerusalem on the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord

Our lighted candles are a sign of the divine splendor of the one who comes to expel the dark shadows of evil and to make the whole universe radiant with the brilliance of his eternal light. Our candles also show how bright our souls should be when we go to meet Christ. The Mother of […]

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Saint Gregory the Theologian’s Advice to a New Bride

Filed in Patristic Texts by on January 26, 2013 0 Comments • views: 1073
Saint Gregory the Theologian’s Advice to a New Bride

We are in Constantinople, in 384 AD. There is a festive event taking place: the wedding of two well-known youths of that time. They are both from upper class families. The bride, Olympiatha, is a remarkable young lady, quite wealthy and a descendant of the imperial family. She is an orphan whose uncle Prokopios (an […]

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“Go back to your cell…”

Filed in Patristic Texts by on January 25, 2013 0 Comments • views: 973
“Go back to your cell…”

There was once a brother who was very eager to seek goodness. Being very disturbed by the demon of lust, he came to a hermit and told him about his thoughts. The hermit was inexperienced and when he heard all this, he was shocked, and said he was a wicked brother, unworthy of his monk’s […]

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“To Praise Athanasius is to Praise Virtue…”

Filed in Patristic Texts by on January 19, 2013 0 Comments • views: 1077
“To Praise Athanasius is to Praise Virtue…”

“To praise Athanasius is to praise virtue… To speak of and admire him fully, would perhaps be too long a task for the present purpose of my discourse, and would take the form of a history rather than of a panegyric: a history which it has been the object of my desires to commit to writing for the pleasure and instruction of posterity, as he himself wrote the life of the divine Antony, and set forth, in the form of a narrative, the laws of the monastic life.

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