Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Instagram Connect on YouTube

Great blessing of the Water and the tossing of the Holy Cross into the sea

Filed in Christmas by on December 19, 2011 0 Comments • views: 1059

The service of the great blessing of the waters and the tossing of the Holy Cross into the sea in Hong Kong (January 2011)

 

 

“Today earth and sea share the joy of the world, and the world has been filled with gladness.”

(Prayer of Patriarch Sophronios of Jerusalem from the Great Blessing of Water on Epiphany)

 

On 6 January we celebrate the Baptism of Jesus in the River Jordan and the manifestation of his divinity when the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove descended on him. According to the Bible, when Jesus was baptized: “he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and alighting on him; and lo, a voice from heaven saying This is my beloved Son” (Matthew 3,17). The baptism of Jesus is considered to reveal the divinity of Jesus and reveals also the three Persons of the Holy Trinity.

On Epiphany Day, a special celebration takes place at all seaside towns. After the Epiphany Divine Liturgy the Bishop leads a procession down to the sea, where a ceremonial baptism is performed. During the ceremony the Bishop throws the holy cross into the sea. The sea represents the whole creation and the holy cross represents Jesus Christ. The Church with the service of the blessing of the waters and the tossing of the holy cross into the sea conveys the sanctification to the whole creation.

In Hong Kong the Service will be conducted this year on Sunday, January 8th at 12.30p.m. at Blake Pier in Stanley.

正教會將於赤柱卜公碼頭舉行主顯節祝水禮

 

香港聖路加正教座堂將於主顯節內舉行多項慶祝活動: 由香港及東南亞教區黎大略都主教主領,於2012年1月8日上午十時在中環聖路加正教座堂慶祝事奉聖禮,約下午十二時半於赤柱卜公碼頭舉行祝水禮 [Greater Blessing of the Water],是次祝水禮將是第三年在香港舉行,為時約15分鐘。

主顯節(1月6日)是正教會十二大節慶之一,慶祝三一上帝在基督領洗的顯現。於信奉正教的國家中,該節日歡慶的傳統包括於海邊祝水及擲放十架到水上。年青的信眾會跳入水中取回十架,而首名取回十架的信徒將得到主教的特別祝福。

這是基督宗教中一個頗為獨特的習俗,在正教會中具有悠長歷史。歡迎蒞臨出席参加。

 

正教會香港及東南亞教區於1996年成立,在港見證正教會傳統。若對是次祝福禮或基督正教信仰有任何查詢,歡迎周一至周六上午+時至下午一時,致電2573 8328,教會辦公室查詢

 

More about the meaning of the Great Blessing of the Water.

 

The sixth of January is the feast of the Epiphany. Originally it was the one Christian feast of the “shining forth” of God to the world in the human form of Jesus of Nazareth. It included the celebration of Christ’s birth, the adoration of the Wisemen, and all of the childhood events of Christ such as his circumcision and presentation to the temple as well as his baptism by John in the Jordan.

Epiphany means shining forth or manifestation. The feast is often called, as it is in the Orthodox service books, Theophany, which means the shining forth and manifestation of God. The emphasis in the present day celebration is on the appearance of Jesus as the human Messiah of Israel and the divine Son of God, One of the Holy Trinity with the Father and the Holy Spirit.

The main feature of the feast of the Epiphany is the Great Blessing of Water. It begins with the singing of special hymns and the censing of the water which has been placed in the center of the church building. Surrounded by candles and flowers, this water stands for the beautiful world of God’s original creation and ultimate glorification by Christ in the Kingdom of God. Sometimes this service of blessing is done out of doors at a place where the water is flowing naturally.

The voice of the Lord cries over the waters, saying: Come all ye, receive the Spirit of wisdom, the Spirit of understanding, the Spirit of the fear of God, even Christ who is made manifest.

Today the nature of water is sanctified. Jordan is divided in two, and turns back the stream of its waters, beholding the Master being baptized.

As a man Thou didst come to that river, 0 Christ our King, and dost hasten O Good One, to receive the baptism of a servant at the hands of the Forerunner (John), because of our sins, 0 Lover of Man (Hymns of the Great Blessing of Waters).

Following are three readings from the Prophecy of Isaiah concerning the messianic age:

Let the thirsty wilderness be glad, let the desert rejoice, let it blossom as a rose, let it blossom abundantly, let everything rejoice … (Is 35: 1-10)

Go to that water, 0 you who thirst, and as many as have no money, let them eat and drink without price, both wine and fat … (Is 55:1-13)

With joy draw the water out of the wells of salvation. And in that day shall you say: Confess ye unto the Lord and call upon his Name; declare his glorious deeds… his Name is exalted … Hymn the Name of the Lord … Rejoice and exult … (Is 12:3.6).

After the epistle (1 Cor 1:10-14) and the gospel reading (Mk 1:9-11) the special great litany is chanted invoking the grace of the Holy Spirit upon the water and upon those who will partake of it. It ends with the great prayer of the cosmic glorification of God in which Christ is called upon to sanctify the water, and all men and all creation, by the manifestation of his saving and sanctifying divine presence by the indwelling of the Holy and Good and Life-creating Spirit.

As the troparion of the feast is sung, the celebrant immerses the Cross into the water three times and then proceeds to sprinkle the water in the four directions of the world. He then blesses the people and their homes with the sanctified water which stands for the salvation of all men and all creation which Christ has effected by his “epiphany” in the flesh for the life of the world.

Sometimes people think that the blessing of water and the practice of drinking it and sprinkling it over everyone and everything is a “paganism” which has falsely entered the Christian Church. We know, however, that this ritual was practiced by the People of God in the Old Testament, and that in the Christian Church it has a very special and important significance.

It is the faith of Christians that since the Son of God has taken human flesh and has been immersed in the streams of the Jordan, all matter is sanctified and made pure in him, purged of its death-dealing qualities inherited from the devil and the wickedness of men. In the Lord’s epiphany all creation becomes good again, indeed “very good,” the way that God himself made it and proclaimed it to be in the beginning when “the Spirit of God was moving over the face of the waters” (Gen 1:2) and when the “Breath of Life” was breathing in man and in everything that God made (Gen 1:30; 2:7).

The world and everything in it is indeed “very good” (Gen 1:31) and when it becomes polluted, corrupted and dead, God saves it once more by effecting the “new creation” in Christ, his divine Son and our Lord by the grace of the Holy Spirit (Gal 6:15). This is what is celebrated on Epiphany, particularly in the Great Blessing of Water. The consecration of the waters on this feast places the entire world — through its “prime element” of watering the perspective of the cosmic creation, sanctification, and glorification of the Kingdom of God in Christ arid the Spirit. It tells us that man and the world were indeed created and saved in order to be “filled with all the fullness of God” (Eph 3:19), the “fullness of him who fills all in all” (Eph 1:22). It tells us that Christ, in who in “the whole fulness of deity dwells bodily,” is and shall be truly “all, and in all” (Col 2:9, 3:11). It tells us as well that the “new heavens and the new earth” which God has promised through his prophets and apostles (Is 66:2; 2 Peter 3:13, Rev 21:1) are truly “with us” already now in the, mystery of Christ and his Church.

Thus, the sanctification and sprinkling of the Epiphany water is no pagan ritual. It is the expression of the most central fact of the Christian vision of man, his life and his world. It is the liturgical testimony that the vocation and destiny of creation is to be “filled with all the fullness of God” (Eph 3:19).

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *